The Digital Crossover: How is Technology Changing our Society?

Old-Thinker News | May 24, 2013

By Daniel Taylor

In a recent article, Old-Thinker News reported on the Google-Bilderberg partnership and the likely strategy this group will pursue into the future. To summarize; The global elite are pushing the globe toward a dystopic future in which all aspects of life are in some way managed by their interests. Future urban development of computerized “U-cities” will reflect this goal. Mega coporations will provide advanced technology to their constituents and thus gain loyalty.

How will this technology impact our society? How has it already impacted our lives?crossover

The wider trends in the world will play a key role in how this situation develops. Technology itself can be used for good or evil. The political, economic and social atmosphere – intertwined with individual choices – will mold the outcome. Here’s a scenario:

The debt crisis, disintegrating society and broken economy force people to shrink their circle of travel out of necessity. The “sustainable development” agenda doubles this effect as it pushes for smaller living space – 250 square foot apartments for example. Trips to the movie theater are cut. Traveling to physical stores is replaced by online shopping. Technology gives individuals a varied array of experiences that previously required real connection with human beings (social networking, netflix, adult material, etc) and enables isolation. When an individual does go out to conduct business, wearable technology in the form of augmented reality contact lenses go with him. Every person on earth is now connected to the internet. Every object is transmitting data.

Teens aren’t getting drivers licenses

The technological revolution is inflicting changes on humanity that have been largely ignored or gone unnoticed. Some are subtle, others are painfully obvious.

Nation wide, the number of teens with drivers licenses is dropping dramatically. In 1983, 69% of 17 year olds had a license. In 2010, only 46% of 17 year olds had one. The University of Michigan speculated on the root causes of this phenomenon. Michael Sivak of the U-M Transportation Research Institute said, “In our previous research, we found that the percentage of young drivers was inversely related to the proportion of Internet users. Virtual contact, through electronic means, reduces the need for actual contact.”

WNYC reported on the dropping number of teen drivers last year. Young listeners responded to the question of why they are not driving, or driving less. Some cited poor economic conditions. One responded, “I drive less because I have become a couch potato. The Internet takes me anywhere I want to go. And services like Netflix provide entertainment at the touch of a button. It’s also a lot more affordable.”

The Demise of Guys

Philip Zimbardo, psychologist and professor at Stanford University, is the author of several books including The Lucifer Effect and The Time Paradox. Zimbardo struck a chord with young men across the country when he delivered a TED talk titled “The Demise of Guys.” He points to the social awkwardness and failing grades of young men as symptoms of a deeper problem.

Watch Zimbardo’s talk:

There is hope

Is humanity destined to a future of a dehumanized, disconnected dystopia? I don’t think so. The human spirit is resilient; Its drive to genuinely connect cannot be silenced forever. The pendulum will swing in the opposite direction as more people realize how our dependency on technology has crippled us. Take the lead today and start unplugging as much as you can. Those who do so now could very well be the envy of the world in a few short years.

 

1 Comment on "The Digital Crossover: How is Technology Changing our Society?"

  1. Sorry, but humanity is on a one way trip to becoming nearly extinct. The world is already a “dehumanized dystopia” and its getting worse. Disconnection from the system will not be allowed because those dependent on IT for their survival will force everyone to adapt, or die! In fact, this is the cry of those pushing the technological revolution toward its ultimate goal. Either accept manmade technological “evolution” or die!

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