Neuro-enhancement in the military: far-fetched or an inevitable future?

The Guardian | October 7, 2013

As the science of brain stimulation forges ahead, neuroscientists and psychologists face tough ethical decisions

About five years ago, not long after I started up my research group at Cardiff University, something rather strange happened. One morning I came down to my lab to find the door wide open and a suited man standing in the middle of the room, peering around and scribbling on a clipboard. He told me he worked for a private defence firm who were interested in applications of my research on human brain stimulation. He also said there was funding available for joint research projects. We spoke for a couple of minutes before I made it clear I wasn’t interested in that sort of collaboration.

Thinking about it afterward, something about the encounter chilled me. It wasn’t the fact that this person had gained access to the lab seemingly unannounced, and it wasn’t even the sense of entitlement that seemed to exude from the guy, as though he was standing in his lab not mine. What bothered me was the realisation that the work I do operates anywhere near the line where a military firm might find it useful. My opinion at the time – still unchanged – was that I would sooner quit science than get into bed with the profiteering wing of those whose raison d’être is foreign intervention and invasion.

Read the entire article here

 

Be the first to comment on "Neuro-enhancement in the military: far-fetched or an inevitable future?"

Leave a Reply