Study: People Ignored On Facebook Feel Isolation, Less ‘Meaningful Existence’

CBS | May 13, 2014

By Benjamin Fearnow

Facebook and other social media websites help billions of people express themselves for the world to see, but these online platforms have now taken on a deeper meaning – people are using it to define themselves.

New research published in the journal Social Influence analyzes how Facebook communication has affected people’s feelings of their own social value and self-esteem. The study finds that the more Facebook likes and comments that a person receives, the more likely they are to feel positive about themselves. On the other hand, the fewer likes and comments responding to a person’s status reflected feelings of loneliness and low self-worth.

In the first part of the Facebook study, “Threats to Belonging on Facebook: lurking and ostracism,” conducted among 79 undergraduate students from the University of Queensland, participants were either allowed or not allowed to share information on Facebook for 48 hours.

Read the entire article here

Be the first to comment on "Study: People Ignored On Facebook Feel Isolation, Less ‘Meaningful Existence’"

Leave a Reply